The new Apple Mac mini makes even less sense

In the past we’ve noted Apple’s insane pricing for their (claimed) entry level Apple PC, the Mac mini. With the latest model released in the past couple of weeks, Apple adds another key reason to avoid the Mac mini, in the continued pointless eroding of customer-replaceable parts. In a rather detailed review from Ars Technica, special mention is made of Apple now sealing off easy access to the device’s innards and the hard-soldering of system memory to its motherboard:

“Older Minis had a round plastic cap on the bottom. Twisting it off would give easy access to the computer’s two RAM slots, and enterprising techies with a screwdriver and a little know-how could lift out the rest of the parts and perform further upgrades… The 2014 Mini still has the plastic hatch on the bottom, but it no longer twists off… now instead of seeing the Mini’s guts you see yet another metal shield, held in place with Torx Security screws. Remove that shield, and after you pull the entire motherboard out and flip it over you’ll finally see that the new Mac Mini’s RAM is soldered directly to the motherboard. It’s no longer user-upgradeable, so make sure you order all the RAM you need when you buy the computer in the first place.”

This continues the generally anti-consumer trend Apple has firmly established in their other products (iPhones, MacBook Pros, et al). The removal of easy access to customer-upgradeable parts is especially relevant to small businesses: unless your organisation is flush with cash, can afford to replace computers outright or can tolerate multi-week outages while your faulty Mac mini is sitting at an Apple service centre, there is little reason to consider the mini in its present incarnation.

If you’re not bound to Apple OS X for any mission-critical applications, then the Intel NUC running Ubuntu makes a more attractive proposition at an even more compact size – which we’ll be covering in a future post or two:

Intel NUC compared to Apple Mac mini

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